Bend-Tech Dragon Tube Cutting and Marking System

When first introduced to the Bend-Tech Dragon Plasma Notcher, it didn’t take us long to figure out how it got its name. Its unique beast-like figure looks intimidating and the sparks from the plasma cutter replicate the breathing of fire. These characteristics are vastly similar the the fictional beast, making the Dragon a perfect name for this hardcore Plasma Notcher.

It’s accuracy and capabilities are unlike any animal we’ve seen, almost as if it’s unreal. The Dragon is capable of taking full length tubing, cutting it to length, notching the end profile, marking holes or slots as needed, and marking any bend locations with rotation and degrees; something you wont find in any other plasma notcher.

Included with the Bend-Tech Dragon is two powerful software packages; Bend-Tech Industrial and Bend-Tech Dragon Software. Working side by side, these products will allow you to create 3D CAD designs from scratch or convert from SOLIDWORKS, AutoCAD, Inventor, PRO Engineer, etc. into a readable format for the machine. Dragon Software will automatically create your cutting, marking and etching paths directly from Bend-Tech Industrial and comes with a nesting ability to allow several parts on the same stock tube.

Check out the video below and see this nonfictional machine in action. This video was shot at the Trick-Tools booth during the 2015 SEMA Show and highlights some of the major characteristics that make the Dragon a necessity in a production environment.

What is Mandrel Tube Bending?

Mandrel tube bending is a widely misunderstood bending term. Many customers and even some bending companies refer to the bending dies as mandrels or shoes. Technically the mandrel is a part of the tooling set but does not exist in most bending applications.
The mandrel actually goes inside the tube and is held by a mandrel rod to support the tube at the tangent point of the bend. The mandrel is then extracted after the bend is complete or within the last few degrees of bending. This requires a machine with a bed longer than the tube being bent and strong enough to support the forces against the mandrel.

Common mandrels configurations include the plug, ball, disc or multi-ball or disc design. The type of mandrel required varies depending on the wall thickness of the tube, radius required, and type of material being bent. Mandrel bending can create a bend much tighter than empty bending as well as improve the appearance of bend.

Mandrel tube bending diagram

Mandrel tube bending diagram

Radii as tight as one times the diameter of the tube (1D) are possible, whereas with empty bending (bends without an internal mandrel) acceptable radii are usually two to three times the diameter (2-3D). This is especially useful for Continue reading